Street Struck-Big L

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Big L

The world of hip hop was deprived of a charismatic rapper in a cold winter of 1999, after Lamonte Coleman aka Big L was gunned down at the cursed age of 25 (see 2pac and Biggie) in the streets of Harlem. In “Street Struck”  L is saying that the only opportunity the streets are offering is selling drugs or robbing stores and houses and he tells how he got away from the dangers of the hood after starting a career in hip hop but ironically in the end the streets took this gifted lyricist away. Continue reading

N.W.A-Fuck The Police

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Top right to left: Dr. Dre, Dj Yella, Ice Cube, Eazy E, MC Ren

As I mentioned in the previous post,  police harassment  was at  peak in the hood and a major source of inspiration for songs dissing the police.

There are many songs that target the police, like KRS’s “Sound of the Police,” Geto Boys’ “G Code,” and Big L’s (Rest In Peace as MC Guru would say), “The Enemy,” but none of these songs is as brutal and hostile lyrically towards the 5-0 as “Fuck The Police” is. Click here for the lyrics. Continue reading

KRS One-Sound of the Police

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KRS

Whoop whoop, that’s the sound of the police. Whoop, whoop, that’s the sound of the beast. The decade when hip hop meant something, in 1993 the one and only KRS One, the person who along with MC Shan first started rap battles and dissing. The person who destroyed careers, MC Shan’s in particular (check the story here) had the wonderful inspiration of recording this masterpiece.

It is one of those songs that best describe NYPD’s attitude towards the black youth not only through the genius verses it contains but through the beat which is in full synergy with the lyrics. Find the lyrics here. Continue reading

They Don’t Give A Fuck-2Pac

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2Pac

2pac’s background history shaped his character and beliefs, since his mother, Afeni Shakur was a member of the revolutionary ‘Black Panthers’ which was a civil rights activist group advocating for equality for African Americans. Such a background inspired and affected 2Pac heavily in his lyrics, because hip hop meant something back then, it had a cause. Continue reading

Eric B. & Rakim-Paid In Full

While reading some stuff online about when hip hop meant something, i came across this post about the hip hop duo Rakim and the DJ Eric B. and i couldn’t agree more. Rakim is considered as one of the best lyricists in the hip hop industry and without doubt this title is rightfully his. His delivery and style were something new at the time since Rakim’s voice sounded deep and serious, creating thus a synergy with his lyrics which were down to business. Continue reading